Update for 3/17/2019

Experimental literature

πŸ€”

My goal in this project is to create a list of experimental works and links to other such lists. I’m basing the organization on a collection of scholarly essays, The Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature. I got a bit done last week, trying out a method of collecting works by scanning the index so I can correlate the entries to the table of contents.

This is the last week for this project, so I’ll need to put a lot more time in. Fortunately my evenings are freer this week. I’ll also need to settle on my methods for the rest of the work as well as a deliverable I can live with for now. I have a feeling I’ll come back to this project in future months to improve it.

I’ve been listening to Arvo PΓ€rt while I work. He’s my main go-to music for experimental literature.

Spirituality

πŸ€”

This year my Lent activity is listening to the audio of the Message version of the Bible. Last week I got through the first third, Genesis-2 Kings (well, almost–I had to finish 2 Kings the next day).

I’ll wait till I’m done with the whole thing to post my thoughts, but so far I’d say it’s a good choice of audio Bible, a decent performance and mostly a very listenable paraphrase. The exercise is also bringing up a lot of my issues with the Bible, which is helpful.

Movies

πŸ™‚

Tuesday I saw Captain Marvel with my geek meetup. I liked it about as well as I’ve liked all the other MCU movies. I knew nothing about the character going in, so the movie version is now my head canon. I especially liked the friendship between Carol and Maria and all the time we got to spend with Nick Fury. Then there was Captain Marvel’s burst of self-discovery near the end. And the mid-end-credits scene.

House of Leaves has put me in the mood for more weird fiction, so Saturday I watched Annihilation, which had been on my mind since I saw the trailer last year. I’d listened to the novels a few years ago, and they confused me enough that I was really looking forward to seeing a filmmaker’s interpretation. I was not disappointed. It was satisfyingly eerie and a much more straightforward variation on the plot, though it had its own mysteries to ponder. I might have to add the soundtrack to my dark ambient collection.

People

πŸ™‚

It seems I’ve been a little more social lately. I’ve had lunch with a friend from church a couple of times in the past month, one of which was Tuesday. It turns out his son posts music transcriptions and original compositions on MuseScore.com, which is where I’ve been putting my exercises, so that was kind of motivating.

It was nice to see my geek meetup Tuesday night. I hadn’t been to any events in a while, and I ended up having a good conversation with the former organizer about happenings in the world of church.

And I’ve joined another board game group run by a coworker, this one in the evening once a month. Jeremy and I went to it on Friday. I won BΓ€renpark and came in last in Queendomino. I like it when the domains of my life mix, so it was fun to introduce my church friend to my work friend.

Posted in Experimental literature, Movies, Social life, Spirituality, Updates | 2 Comments

Update for 3/10/2019

Music

😎

Tuesday I took the afternoon off from work, took a long nap, and then headed out to see Jacob Collier in concert.

I came in with only vague expectations, but he met and exceeded them. He was creative, energetic, and uplifting, and he got the audience singing. For “In My Room,” he even had us sit on the floor (the lower level had no chairs) and sing along while the band sat on the edge of the stage, like we were at a big campfire. Like this but in Chicago:

When I think “live version” of a song, I think of just a messier rendition of the studio recording. But that wouldn’t do for Jacob Collier. No, his live versions are completely different arrangements. For example, here’s the album version of “In the Real Early Morning.” And here’s someone’s video of the live version. I wouldn’t be surprised if he improvised it on the spot. Here are some other clips to give you the flavor of the rest of the show.

It was a good experience, and Lincoln Hall did a good job of advertising their other artists. I’m thinking of looking them up to see who might bring me back.

I didn’t really do anything else for my birthday, which was on Thursday, except for getting a bunch of nice birthday messages (thank you!). But I’m considering the concert my celebration, and it was plenty!

Thinking

πŸ€”

To get me through the drive to the concert, I started the audiobook of Nicholas Nassim Taleb’s Antifragile. Antifragility is the property of benefiting from disorder, as opposed to being damaged by it (fragility) or simply being resistant to it (robustness). I finished the book on Saturday.

It was good, but I wouldn’t say great. I enjoyed his opinionated, gratuitously insulting style in Black Swan, but in Antifragile it seemed extra gratuitous, and I got tired of it quickly. And a lot of his supporting examples sounded like matters of personal preference. A lot of others were based merely on his rules of thumb, which doesn’t count as evidence. But the general idea of antifragility seems like an important one, so I’d like to look into it further.

Despite his snark and combativeness, I did find some personal qualities to admire. He comes across as having a strong sense of ethics. Practicing what you preach (having “skin in the game”) is a key part of his message, he feels it his duty to call out fraud, and he values helping the weak. With all that, I felt more inspired to act with integrity and generosity.

Spirituality

πŸ€”

I’m not doing a great job at keeping up with the liturgical year like I intended, so I’m downgrading that project to my usual level of inattention. Maybe I’ll try again next year.

Lent crept up on me, and I didn’t realize it was Ash Wednesday till my coworker walked in with ashes on his forehead. I hadn’t planned any Lent practices, but I decided it’d be a good time to listen to the audio Bible my brother gave me for Christmas, The Message Remix. It’s The Message read by Kelly Ryan Dolan but with certain sections read by different Christian celebrities. I requested that version so the reading would have some variety.

I’m going to try my high intensity listening pace with this Bible. That amounts to two hours a day, spread over my commutes and meals plus a little extra. At 2x speed The Message Remix is about 40 hours, so it should take me three weeks to get through it. That fits into Lent nicely.

The quickest I’ve gotten through an audio Bible in the past is 90 days. Here are some reflections from one of those listens. I’m curious to see how my impressions this time compare.

Software development

πŸ€”

I finished Refactoring Databases. I love databases as a programming tool, but I don’t know enough about them to evaluate this book fairly, so I’m taking other people’s word for it that it’s great. If nothing else, this one and the other books in the evolutionary distributed software architecture family give me a starting point for learning more about these topics.

Coding project generator

😐

Not only did I put this project on hold to get through House of Leaves, I’ve taken it off this month’s agenda altogether in favor of a different project, which I’ll tell you about in the Fiction section. And then I have another project in mind for April, so I’m planning to get back to the project generator in May.

Fiction

House of Leaves

😎

Last week I pushed myself through reading the 700-page novel House of Leaves. It’s a classic of the found footage horror genre. I read it for a challenge posed by a YouTuber named Nick Nocturne, a lead-up to the first in his series of videos analyzing the book. It’s definitely an R-rated book, but if you don’t mind that and you like having your mind twisted in metafictional knots, it’s a good one. According to Nick, it has inspired and shaped a lot of creative work in the genre.

If this had been an audiobook, reading it in nine days would’ve been no problem. But print reading is difficult for me because I’m so easily sidetracked, and I slow way down when I’m bored. But I remembered I have a trick–I time each page with the stopwatch on my phone, and that keeps me focused enough to maintain a nice pace. After a while of that at the beginning, I realized the story was carrying me along on its own, so then I read normally, and I only had to use the trick a couple of times after that.

The other trouble was setting aside the time to read. I haven’t really solved that yet. But somehow despite days of very little reading mixed with a few multi-hour sessions, I got through the whole thing by Saturday evening.

The dark ambient music from my Pandora station was a fitting backdrop to the novel. I ended up mostly listening to a playlist on my phone that was derived from the station.

Experimental literature

😎

That leads me to my project for the rest of this month. Nick has been very involved in the House of Leaves Challenge, retweeting the participants and putting their book photos in his video. He even retweeted my link to my dark ambient station.

So I was thinking my fellow House of Leaves readers might like some pointers to more experimental literature, and this would be a perfect opportunity to finish a project I started two years ago to collect such a list. My starting point is The Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature. It should be easy enough to finish the project in the next couple of weeks. I don’t know how much attention it’ll get, but it’ll at least be worth it for my own reading.

Posted in Coding project generator, Experimental literature, Fiction, Music, Software development, Spirituality, Thinking, Updates | 2 Comments

Update for 3/3/2019

Housekeeping

πŸ™‚

I’ve actually been cleaning up around the apartment … about eight months after I moved here. Sure, I’m mostly just shoving stuff in closets and cabinets, but at least the floor looks less cluttered.

Software development

πŸ€”

My latest project on software development practices is done, but my book listening continues. Last week I completed Building Microservices. This is in a family of books on evolutionary distributed software architecture. Release It!, which I finished the week before, was also in that family, though that one was less about evolution.

The idea of Building Microservices is that splitting your application into many small services can make it flexible enough to evolve easily. Since I haven’t done that much with networks or web development, I only understood bits and pieces of it, but I could sort of see why people think highly of it. The author packs in a lot of advice.

Now I’m on Refactoring Databases, which was written years earlier but also belongs in the family.

Coding project generator

😐

Last week I did some planning. This week I might get to some coding. This project has a lot of little pieces to take care of, but I think most of it will be pretty easy.

Fiction

😎

Part of project management is risk management, and my generator project has already been confronted by a risk of derailment. The cause is an interdimensional shapeshifting cat monster on the Internet. The cat in question is Nick Nocturne, host of the YouTube channel Night Mind, which does analysis of horror media.

Last week Nick posted a video to introduce his next series of uploads, which will be analyzing the novel House of Leaves, and he challenged all his viewers to read the whole 700-page thing in the nine days before the first video goes up. I accepted. I don’t normally do challenges like that, but this book was on my to-read list, and joining the crowd of readers sounded fun.

700 pages in 9 days is around 75 pages per day. How will I juggle the book and the coding? I’m not sure, but I might decide to postpone the coding till next week. Like I said, the tasks seem fairly easy.

And if you aren’t into horror but you’re interested in books with a creative format, S. might be the book for you.

Music

πŸ™‚

I have another project interruption this week. Last summer I started getting into the music of Jacob Collier, a jazz prodigy who in 2017 won two Grammys in a row. Last year I skipped his concert in Chicago to my instant regret, so when he announced his next one here, I bought a ticket ASAP. Well the time has come, and his concert is on Tuesday! My birthday is on Thursday, so it’s like an early present.

Posted in Birthdays, Coding project generator, Fiction, Housekeeping, Music, Software development, Updates | 2 Comments

Update for 2/24/2019

Software development

πŸ™‚

I finished February’s work on my software development notes. Despite a late start and general laziness, I think the project went decently well. Here’s the project in its current state. I’m taking the Zettelkasten approach of treating the content as a flat list of entries that I organize in a separate document (in this case, the main project page). I’ll probably make this the default way of organizing my projects.

The purpose of February’s sprint changed as it progressed. I wanted to come up with a basic procedure for my programming projects, but that ended up being too ambitious for the way the project was going. Instead I set up buckets to drop my future software development notes into. My plan is to do a lot of that work incidentally as I do my other programming projects.

In related reading, I finished IEEE’s Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK). I give it 4/5. It’s important and fairly comprehensive. But I have problems with the organization, which is most of the reason I was reading it.

After SWEBOK I started Release It!, a poorly named but respected book on designing your web app to survive in the wild.

Coding project generator

πŸ™‚

My next programming project will be for Thinkulum March, which starts this week. It’s a continuation of the project generating program I started writing a couple of years ago. It creates boilerplate code to kick off a programming project. This month I’m going to try to get it to version 1.0. This week is the initial planning and exploration phase.

Posted in Coding project generator, Software development, Updates | Leave a comment

Update for 2/17/2019

Programming

πŸ€”

February’s main project is my notes on software development. I got a late start, so last week was week 2 of 3.

  • I renamed the project’s wiki article from “From Private to Public Coding” to simply “Software Development.”
  • I added a categorized bibliography of the SD books I’ve collected.

I meant to create an outline of the topics I want to cover, but I ran into multiple problems. Instead I’m going to break up the article’s current content into separate articles, start writing my software development procedure, and link to subtopic articles from the procedure.

I’m pleased with the troubleshooting I’ve been doing.

I finished Information Architecture: For the Web and Beyond. It was good, but somehow I was expecting more. Maybe it did all the mind opening I needed it for back when I first read it. Still, I’ll study it in more detail when I get around to organizing my information.

Deciding how to organize my software development notes has turned my attention to IEEE’s Guide to the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK), a free book you can download here. It’s an overview of the whole field, and so far it seems like a thorough and balanced starting point for studying the subject.

Research

😎

Recently an Amazon recommendation lodged itself in my mind and wouldn’t leave, a book called How to Take Smart Notes. It’s an exploration of the note-taking system of a prolific German sociologist named Niklas Luhmann. The system is called a Zettelkasten, or slip-box, and it’s sort of like a personal wiki. Here’s a video of a talk by the author. Here’s the book’s website. Here’s another writer’s explanation, and here’s another website dedicated to the system. An academic group studying Luhmann’s notes is here.

The reason the Zettelkasten method caught my attention is that it amounts to a more formalized and advanced version of the note-taking method I picked up last year from Peg Boyle Single’s Demystifying Dissertation Writing. It also overlaps with ideas from information architecture and semantic networks. And I always like methods that have communities that study and use them and share their findings.

Also I’ve run across Niklas Luhmann before. He was a systems theorist and wrote an introduction that I found early in my research. I haven’t read it though.

TV

😎

I’ve been catching up on Dark Matter. It’s a a space-based cyberpunk ensemble show adapted from a comic. I watched season 1 a few years ago, and I’ve missed it. Things that stand out to me now that I’m back:

    • I mainly care about the settings and the characters, but the show has a detailed political layer that would give it some rewatch value if I wanted to try to sort that all out.
    • The set design and music match the genre perfectly.
Posted in Programming, Research, TV, Updates | Leave a comment

Update for 2/10/19

Programming

πŸ™‚

I planned out this month’s software development project. I’m feeling pretty good about its modest goals. At the end of the month I want to end up with a basic procedure for my programming projects, along with a framework to fill in with details over time. This week’s goal is to finish the bibliography I was supposed to post last week and then post a broad outline of the topics I want to cover.

I finished listening to About Face, a very detailed and thorough guide to creating user interfaces. It walks you through gathering the requirements for your software and then discusses aspects of UI from general principles down to specific controls. 6/5. I highly recommend it.

Next is Information Architecture: For the Web and Beyond. An earlier edition of this was one of the first software development books I read years ago. It’s good to come back to it.

TV

😎

I took a couple of days to watch a special episode of Black Mirror called “Bandersnatch.” It’s a branching plot story in Netflix form, where the viewer chooses what happens next. It was very well done.

It took me back to my days of reading Choose Your Own Adventure books and playing text adventures. One of my earliest programming books was Christopher Lampton’s How to Create Adventure Games. I’m sure I knew about interactive stories already, but there was something magical about creating a world inside the computer that someone could explore.

People

πŸ™‚

On Friday and Saturday I helped my coworker Matt move into his new house. It kinda wore me out for the rest of the weekend. But it ended what I assume was the most stressful period of their move, so I’m glad I could help get it done.

Posted in Programming, Social life, TV, Updates | 2 Comments

Update for 2/3/2019

Housekeeping

πŸ€”

January’s apartment tidying project has “concluded.” I’m done dedicating project time to it for now, but I’ll keep working on it in the background. In spite of my lack of work on it during its scheduled month, I had a retrospective for it anyway.

What worked:

  • I initially wanted to purge my possessions while unpacking my boxes from my move. This proved to be more than I wanted to think about at the time. Dropping that requirement let me reduce my procrastinating.
  • I dropped the requirement to have a clearly defined home for everything in advance. My plan became simply to put my things roughly where they belonged and let the resulting lack of space guide my later purge and organization.
  • I gave myself permission to work a little at a time, putting away whatever items I could easily place as I moved around the apartment.

What didn’t:

  • I stuck to my demotivating requirements too long, hoping I could break out of my procrastination.
  • I didn’t think through a plan before beginning the project time period.
  • I didn’t do regular retrospectives or planning sessions.

Conceptual modeling

😐

I meant to do a retrospective for January’s accidental Semantic Web project, but I was too lazy, so I’ll try to get to it this week.

Projects

😎

This year, to give my projects a simple and predictable schedule that fits with my blogging routine, I’m going to try giving them each four weeks. With a normal calendar this doesn’t quite fit with the one-a-month rhythm I was planning, since there are 12 months in the year but 13 groups of 4 weeks to make 52.

However, there is a calendar that’s organized that way, the International Fixed Calendar. The year always begins on a Sunday, each month has 28 days, and there’s an extra month between June and July called Sol. There’s an extra day at the end of each year called Year Day, and on leap year there’s an extra day at the end of June.

I’m going to try a variation on the IFC for scheduling my projects. I’ll call it the Thinkulum calendar. I’m starting the reckoning from 2017, since that year began on a Sunday. Rather than having the IFC’s Year Day and Leap Day, my version will have a leap week at the end of every few years (the first one in 2022) so the project calendar can catch up with the Gregorian calendar. In those cases both calendars will start the year on a Sunday.

Simple, right? Don’t worry. If the experiment continues, I’ll keep track of the project cycles for you.

Programming

πŸ™‚

With all that, Thinkulum February started last week on Sunday, Jan 27. So I’m already a week behind on my next project, which is to organize some notes on software development. Fortunately I’ve been working on it because of my related work activities. But I haven’t done my formal planning for it, which I’ll do this week and officially start on the project.

I finished listening toΒ User Story Mapping. The style is more conversational than I like, and I have issues with the organization, but the technique seems like a very good one. I’m going to try it with our project at work.

Now I’m starting on a set of books about some categories of software requirement I’m not very familiar with. The first is Alan Cooper’s About Face, about user interfaces. Other books will be about stability, security, and privacy.

TV

😎

I finished the first season of Dark. There’s purportedly going to be a second season, and I hope so because the end of the first was a cliffhanger that dramatically expanded the setting of the story. The show is even more LOST-like than I realized at first, so I highly recommend it if you like that sort of thing and you don’t mind a TV-MA rating. It’s also a fairly deep and thoughtful show.

Posted in Housekeeping, Programming, Projects, TV, Updates | Leave a comment

Update for 1/27/2019

Christmas gift labels

πŸ€”

I’ve done enough of a retrospective to call this project done.

The good:

  • It turned out really well. My family liked the cards and stories, and they were curious and asked me questions about the project.
  • I was able to reduce the scope of the work several times, which was one part of project management I wanted to practice.
  • I found a new way to make the work fun: Listening to fitting soundscapes, especially paired with music. In this case it was usually Victorian Christmas music with the sound of a cabin with a fireplace and howling wind.

The improvable:

  • For its relative importance, I spent way too long on it, 10-11 hours per week for a total of 75 hours.
  • I should have iterated on the walking skeleton rather than dividing the work so much into task-related phases. That is, create a very simple but working prototype and then gradually add to it till I run out of time.
  • I need to pick a medium rather than trying to tackle more than one, in this case text, audio, and images. The gift labels each year will always have some degree of visual presentation, but I need to pick extremely simple ones if the main point isn’t visual. The project could’ve been 20-30 hours shorter with a simpler design.
  • I didn’t know how to organize my files, so they were more confusing and time-consuming to work with.
  • I didn’t feel I had time to manage the project properly according to the book I was working from, and my adaptation of the process was kind of disorganized. Next I’m going to try adapting the methods of agile software development.

Housekeeping

πŸ€”

January was supposed to be Month of Tidying, but it really didn’t work out that way. I couldn’t get motivated, and I spent my time on other projects instead. But I want to keep my flow of projects moving, so instead of putting everything else off month after month till I can motivate myself to spend all my time on housekeeping, I’m going to give the tidying project background status. I’ll just try to do a little each day, or whenever I can get to it. Marie Kondo says not to do it that way, but tidying is apparently not giving me enough joy to focus on it now.

Conceptual modeling

πŸ™‚

January has actually been Month of the Semantic Web. This falls under my conceptual modeling project. And ProtΓ©gΓ©, the software I’m learning for making Semantic Web models (called ontologies), covers a lot of the features I was imagining for a modeling tool I was thinking of creating. So instead of writing one from scratch, I can focus on the features I’d like to add in the form of plugins.

Programming

πŸ™‚

February will be Month of Software Development. My goals at this point are to summarize the software development reading I’ve been doing and maybe finish version 1 of my coding project generator. I might run out of time and need to put off the generator.

Conveniently, at work we’re starting to look at how we can adopt some of these development practices. So my personal and work projects will be aligned for a while.

To help us kick off the work project we’ll be using to test these methods, I’m reading another book in my software development list, User Story Mapping. It also turns out to apply to my conceptual modeling project, and it has a lot of overlap with the insights I was gaining last year about shaping a model through free-form internal and interpersonal dialogue.

Fiction

πŸ™‚

I finished the last book of the the Mortal Engines Quartet, A Darkling Plain. Things that stood out to me about this series, which I loved:

  • It’s a richly developed steampunk world without overly reveling in the genre. The world is a backdrop for the characters.
  • The story balances action and character-oriented reflection. It’s a very human series. Even the not-quite-humans have personalities and issues to resolve.
  • It’s really one long story, so don’t worry if the first book leaves you a little confused. The later books will pick up the threads.
  • It spends a lot of time exploring questions of violence and competition on both individual and societal levels. Also questions of family and identity.

After that I had a little audiobook crisis where I didn’t know what to listen to next. I settled on one of my old Audible purchases, Will Save the Galaxy for Food by Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw. I discovered him long ago when he was a popular adventure game creator. Then he became a popular video game critic, and now I guess he’s a popular novelist. He has the type of cynical wit I’m used to from other British authors like Terry Pratchett and Charles Stross. I guess I’d consider the book light satire. It wasn’t as much a biting commentary on society as it was a parody of various kinds of people combined with an earnest point about life.

Posted in Conceptual modeling, Fiction, Holidays, Housekeeping, Programming, Updates | 1 Comment

Update for 1/20/2019

Health

😐

My intestines finally calmed down from the long gap in my ulcerative colitis treatments. That’s a relief, especially since I partly blame all my bathroom visits for the slow start to my projects this year. Only partly though.

Housekeeping

😐

I got tired of procrastinating on my apartment tidying, and I got through sorting my few boxes of clothes. Hopefully that’ll give me some momentum for the rest of my belongings. Since I don’t want to put off other projects after this month and I’ve frittered away so much time, I’ll prioritize the boxes that are cluttering my everyday living space.

That’s going to be my experimental policy for now. I’ll dedicate a month to each project, and if I don’t fit the whole project into that time frame, I’m still moving on to the next project when the month changes.

Fiction

πŸ™‚

I finished book 3 of the Mortal Engines Quartet, Infernal Devices, and I’m on to the last book. After slowing down for a while because I wasn’t in a fiction mood, I’m back to my usual audiobook pace. I should finish that book this week, and then I’ll comment on the series as a whole.

TV

😎

My new TV has put me back in a TV watching mode. So that’s taking up my dinnertime rather than audiobooks.

I finished season 1 of Star Trek: Discovery (DISC) and the first episode of season 2, which started last week. I’d forgotten they don’t release the whole season at once, so I couldn’t binge watch it. But that’s okay, because there are other shows I’ve been wanting to get to.

In between DISC seasons, I watched a couple more episodes of the original Star Trek (TOS), picking up from where I left off years ago watching the remastered version. “Mudd’s Women”: I liked Harry Mudd much better in DISC, and I could only take the ending seriously if I took it very metaphorically. “What Are Little Girls Made Of?”: This one brings up issues that are relevant to my AI interests, but it handles them in a pretty cursory and clumsy manner. So these weren’t my favorite episodes.

After DISC I decided to try a Netflix show that kept catching my eye, Dark. I’m three episodes in, and it’s satisfyingly mysterious and eerie so far, like Stranger Things mixed with LOST. The music contributes a lot.

My first surprise was that it’s German. The dub is fine, but I found that I felt the cultural differences a little less if I put the audio on German and read the English subtitles instead. I also decided to skip the audio description (which would mean hearing the English dub anyway). I found I wanted the show to happen to me rather than being guided through it.

Posted in Fiction, Health, Housekeeping, TV, Updates | 2 Comments

Update for 1/13/2019

Health

πŸ€”

I had my Remicade infusion on Tuesday to manage my ulcerative colitis. Thanks mostly to my insurance, I’d had a two-week gap in my treatments, and my condition had declined noticeably. I’d say my symptoms have improved only 40-50%, so I’m still doing some extra doses of my supplementary medicine. I might make an appointment to see what my gastro doctor has to say.

Politics

πŸ€”

Last week my distraction topic of choice was the rationalist community and its associates. Reddit hooked me with another post criticizing people linked with the LessWrong website. I ended up at some interesting critiques of Bayesianism.

After descending down that rabbit hole for a while, I decided to take a closer look at a community that tends to hang around the rationalists, the neoreactionary movement, which, roughly speaking, is part of the alt-right. They basically want to bring back old societal values and institutions such as racism and monarchy.

I find their viewpoint distasteful enough that I usually avoid reading about it. But since my own ignorance annoys me and I was procrastinating on other things, it seemed like the right time to dive in. Luckily the good people at RationalWiki had done the research for me, so I read their overview article, and then I read Scott Alexander’s two posts explaining the movement and rebutting it. Very enlightening.

TV

πŸ™‚

To make use of my new HD TV, I’ve been catching up on Star Trek: Discovery. The new season starts on Thursday. After the first episode or two, back when the first season came out, I wasn’t sure what I’d think. The dialogue’s quality was very lacking. But I’m impressed with how good the show became over the course of the season. I’m especially enjoying Sonequa Martin-Green as Michael Burnham and Doug Jones as Saru.

Gift labels

😐

My remaining task on this project is the retrospective, where I analyze how it went. I meant to finish it two weeks ago. Last week I managed to stop procrastinating enough to outline it. Maybe I’ll make even more progress this week!

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